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Conference calls for more urgent action on mangroves

The closing session of the International Conference on Sustainable Mangrove Ecosystems. (L-R: Dr. H.O. Ma, (ITTO); Dr. A. Justianto (MOEF); and Dr. S. Baba (ISME)

The closing session of the International Conference on Sustainable Mangrove Ecosystems. (L-R: Dr. H.O. Ma, (ITTO); Dr. A. Justianto (MOEF); and Dr. S. Baba (ISME)

Recognizing an urgent need to reduce the continuing loss and degradation of mangroves, participants in the International Conference on Sustainable Mangrove Ecosystems, have urged policymakers, mangrove practitioners and scientists, costal communities, international organizations, the private sector, and donors to “redouble their work” to ensure the conservation, restoration, protection and sustainable management and use of the world’s remaining mangrove ecosystems.

Mangroves are key element of Bali tourism, says Vice Governor

Ketut Sudikerta, Vice Governor of Bali, said that Indonesia needed to strengthen mangrove conservation. Photo: K. Sato/ITTO

Ketut Sudikerta, Vice Governor of Bali, said that Indonesia needed to strengthen mangrove conservation. Photo: K. Sato/ITTO

Indonesia needs to strengthen its efforts to conserve mangroves because the richness of flora and fauna in mangrove ecosystems is a key element of Bali’s tourism industry, according to the Vice Governor of Bali Province, Ketut Sudikerta.

Flying under the radar?

Throughout the tropics, the wood sector provides hundreds of thousandsof people with jobs, including in artisanal operations that can go unnoticed in official statistics but which are crucial employers in rural areas. In this edition of the Tropical Forest Update, Paolo Cerutti and co-authors (page 3) report that artisanal chainsaw millers in Côte d’Ivoire—mostly young people seeking to become financially independent—produce at least one-quarter of the country’s domestic wood supply and probably much more; there is also substantial cross-border trade with neighbouring countries.

Celebrating the International Day of Forests: Sustainable charcoal in Côte d’Ivoire

A small grant from ITTO in 2009 provided the stimulus for a women’s association in Côte d’Ivoire to improve charcoal production using efficient, eco-friendly techniques, in the process increasing the standard of living in the local community and raising awareness of the importance of forest conservation. Now, the MALEBI women’s association is implementing a larger ITTO project to reforest and rehabilitate the nearby Ahua gazetted forest to ensure a continuous supply of wood for charcoal production.

New study on timber tracking in Guatemala

A study on timber tracking by Guatemala’s National Forest Institute (INAB) has added considerably to understanding of timber flows in the country’s three most important timber areas. Combined, the provinces of Guatemala and Chimaltenago and the municipality of San Agustín Acasaguastlán produce 45% of the country’s timber volume, including processed products such as sawnwood, wood chips, plywood and particleboard. The timber-tracking study, which is an output of ITTO project TFL-PPD 040/13 Rev.2 (M), identifies the sources of raw materials and the destinations of processed products.

New manual for managing African mahogany plantations

CSIR -Forestry Research Institute of Ghana recently published "Managing mahogany plantations in the tropics" with the aim of helping farmers and other smallholders establish and manage plantations of African mahogany (Khaya) species. The manual is as an output of the ITTO project PD 528/08 Rev.1 (F).