Market Information Service

Towards greater transparency in the tropical timber markets

The ITTO Tropical Timber Market (TTM) Report, an output of the ITTO Market Information Service (MIS), is published in English every two weeks with the aim of improving transparency in the international tropical timber market. The TTM provides market trends and trade news from around the world, as well as indicative prices for over 400 tropical timber and added-value products.


 

 

1-15 May 2014

Top story

Teak log prices collapse on heels of log export ban

 
Prices offered for teak logs during the latest open tender in Myanmar were sharply down from levels at the auction just prior to the beginning of the log export ban.

Logs can no longer be exported from Myanmar so increased volumes have become available to the domestic mills which do not yet have the capacity to process the large volume of logs available.
 

 

Also in this issue

  • Sapele from Congo now coming onto the market
  • Ghana on track to trade FLEGT licensed timber
  • Biomass and Bioenergy, an opportunity for Indonesian forestry 
  • Indian mills switch to domestic teak as imported logs getting smaller
  • Infrared scan to distinguish mahogany from ‘look-a-likes’
  • 25 million cubic metres of particleboard annually in China
  • EU decking market starts slow but gaining momentum
  • Dark colours and strong texture - the choice of US buyers of flooring

Data snapshot

Ratio of Architects to Population



Data source: INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ARCHITECTS
 http://www.uia-architectes.org/en/exercer/exercer-dans-le-monde/commission-uia#.U27jBVdxX3D
 

Per capita, there are about seven times as many architects in Japan as in the US, five times more than in either France or the UK and a whopping twenty four times than is Russia.  The architect numbers reflect the huge demand for homes in Japan and yet Japan’s population is falling and the economy has been in recession for a decade, how is this explained?
It turns out that half of all homes in Japan are demolished within 40 years. Some families replace the complete house in much less than that.  In Japan homes loose value at an astonishing rate because there is no demand for pre-owned homes such that after about 30 years while land holds its value the house is worthless, good business for architects and builders.

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