Market Information Service

Towards greater transparency in the tropical timber markets

The ITTO Tropical Timber Market (TTM) Report, an output of the ITTO Market Information Service (MIS), is published in English every two weeks with the aim of improving transparency in the international tropical timber market. The TTM provides market trends and trade news from around the world, as well as indicative prices for over 400 tropical timber and added-value products.


 

 

16-30 September 2013

Top story

CITES seeks assistance from importers of Madagascar timber 

The CITES Secretariat has issued a Notification to Parties to CITES seeking assistance in preventing trade in threatened timber species from Madagascar.
 
ITTO has been cooperating with CITES in Madagascar and elsewhere through the ITTO-CITES Programme. CITES wishes the information in the links below to be disseminated as widely as possible.


http://www.cites.org/eng/notif/2013/E-Notif-2013-039.pdf
http://www.cites.org/fra/notif/2013/F-Notif-2013-039.pdf
http://www.cites.org/esp/notif/2013/S-Notif-2013-039.pdf
 


Also in this issue

  • Cameroon acquires tracking software          
     
  • Port facilities in Sabah to be upgraded
     
  • Brazilian industry calls for increased automation to improve productivity
     
  • Japanese economist says be prepared for zero growth in 2014
     
  • US ready to impose massive duties on Chinese plywood
     
  • EU importers see opportunities for tropical hardwood
     
  • Study confirms EU wood consumption has negligible impact on deforestation
     
  • American Alliance for Hardwood Plywood condemns high duties on Chinese plywood

Data snapshot

 

Planted forest area brazil eucalyptus pine SFM

 

Data source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2013/09/24/225443718/currency-the-u-s-is-dominant-europe-is-fading-and-china-is-irrelevant-for-now

 
 
The U.S. dollar is the currency of choice for international trade accounting for around 45% of all global financial transactions. The euro is the second most traded currency but its status has fallen in recent years because of the economic crisis in Europe.
 
China’s renminbi accounts for only 1 percent of the global currency trade but the Chinese government wants to see the national currency play a bigger international role so has been slowly freeing up self imposed restrictions.



 

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